African American Education in Alabama: Class Resources

You’ll be able to find links to readings and other class resources here. Please check back as we’ll be posting new things that we mention in class as well as event sign ups.

African American Education in Alabama

Course description: This eight week course will introduce students to the historic struggle for equal education in Alabama. From early attempts at self-education by enslaved people, to the establishment of institutes of higher education or elementary education, we’ll hear from a host of expert teachers each week. The class will culminate with a field trip to tour historic African American schools and hear about efforts to preserve them

Schedule

September 14: Overview (Keith Hebert and Elijah Gaddis)

September 21:“THEY KNOW TOO MUCH ALREADY:” BLACK EDUCATION IN POST-EMANCIPATION ERA COLUMBUS, GA, 1866-1876
Will Thomas, doctoral student, Auburn University Department of History

September 28: The origins of higher education for Alabama African Americans: Selma University
Dr. Stanford Angion, President, Selma University

October 5: The Origins of the Rosenwald Movement
Gorham Bird, Assistant Professor of Architecture, Auburn University

October 12: Panel on desegregating primary education

October 19: Desegregating higher education: the example of Auburn
Dr. Martin T. Ollif, Professor of History, Troy University

October 26: The Equalization Movement
Dr. Keith Hebert, Draughon Associate Professor of Southern History, Auburn University

November 2: Field trip
We’ll be traveling today to Shiloh Rosenwald school in Notasulga, Tankersley Rosenwald in Hope Hull, and equalization and Rosenwald schools in Autauga County. We’ll be providing a bus and lunch through the generosity of the Philpott Fund of the Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts and Humanities. We’ll provide full details later, but this trip will take several hours. We hope that all participants can join this important culminating experience.

Readings

Keith Hebert and Hilary Green, Historic Resource Study of African American Schools in the South, 1865-1900

Mary Ames, A New England Woman’s Diary in Dixie in 1865

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